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The ballads “I’ve Grown Accustomed to Her Face,” “Angelito,” and “Adios, Mi Corazon” provide contrasts with Alpert‘s sensitive scores never seeming maudlin or unnecessarily over the top. Original Release Date: 1965 Re-issue Date: 2015 Building upon South of the Border‘s (1964) Top Ten success, Herb Alpert dismissed the contingency of Los Angeles-based studio instrumental all-stars, which he had christened the Tijuana Brass.

If the regal “El Presidente” sounds particularly familiar, it may well be due to Alpert‘s slight renovation of the “Winds of Barcelona” from the Tijuana Brass‘ previous effort, the less than impressive Herb Alpert’s Tijuana Brass, Vol. It was renamed “El Presidente,” presumably to honor the then-recent memory of the slain U. Because there was enough demand for live dates, just like a musical Gepetto, Alpert formed a real Tijuana Brass.

Pisano, who debuted as a composer on Going Places, comes up with a memorably whistleable song, “So What’s New,” and the rest of Alpert‘s songwriting brigade (Ervan Coleman, Julius Wechter, and Sol Lake) chime in with some lively, catchy tunes.

There is also an assortment of pop, film, and Broadway standards of the day, all impeccably arranged by Alpert, whose production instincts grew sharper and surer with every release. (Standing Room Only), referring to the Tijuana Brass’ string of sold-out concerts, is an accurate title, for this LP is about a seven-piece band loaded with experienced jazzers who groove and swing together to a greater degree than on their previous albums.

Also, Alpert was just getting the TJB concept underway; the textures are leaner, the productions less polished, and the accent is more consciously on a Mexican mariachi ambience — the relatively square rhythms, the mandolins, the mournful, wistful siesta feeling — than the records down the road.

2 (1963) failed to ignite a fire in listener’s ears.For instance, the mod sonic wrinkle in “Girl from Ipanema” emits a darkness veiled in mystery, directly contrasting the light buoyancy of “Hello!Dolly” or the footloose feel of the Beatles‘ “All My Loving.” They seamlessly fit in with Sol Lake‘s “Salud, Amor y Dinero” and a cover of Julius Wechter‘s playful, midtempo “Up Cherry Street” — which Wechter‘s own Baja Marimba Band had just recorded for their 1964 self-titled debut.Original Release Date: 1962 Re-issue Date: 2015 The colossus that is A&M Records starts right here with the first album by the 1960s instrumental juggernaut known as the Tijuana Brass.True, there was no “Tijuana Brass” per se at this time; just Herb Alpert and a coterie of Los Angeles sessionmen, with Alpert overdubbing himself on trumpet to get that bullring effect.

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