Fecundating

What is notable about Chamoiseau's practice as marqueur de paroles is that he regards the three principal dimensions of language in contemporary Martinique--acrolectal French, basilectal creole, and the spread of interlectal forms that has emerged between them--as mutually (or potentially so) rather than as necessarily, and in every circumstance, antagonistic(30); more precisely, he regards their very friction as a source of creative richness and, beyond that, of pleasure.

This verse points out that the first stage in the formation of rain is wind.

Until the beginning of the 20th century, the only relationship known between the wind and the rain was that it was the wind that drove the clouds.

However, modern meteorological findings have demonstrated the "fecundating" role of the wind in the formation of rain.

Many plants on Earth disperse their pollen by means of the wind in order to ensure the survival of their species.

Several open-seeded plants, pine trees, palm and similar trees, seeded plants that produce flowers, and grass-like plants are entirely pollinated by the wind.

These particles, known as "aerosols," mix with dust carried from the land by the wind, and are carried to the upper layers of the atmosphere.

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Tony Mathiot has followed the trail of its fragrance back to its primeval origins and discovers how once upon a time vanilla brought fortune and prosperity to the Seychelles power over Antonietta signifies the regime's ability to make of her, and of the feminized Italian body politic as a whole, (3) the vessel for the engendering of a new breed of italianita, fathered by the Fascist agenda for power.

Genius needs to retreat upon itself, to fecundate itself until from the nightmare of one life is born the dream of another.

There remained no other free communities whose culture could fecundate that of the Greek and other cities held in tutelage.

As mentioned, winds "fecundate" the water vapour floating in the air with the particles they carry from the sea, and eventually help the formation of rain clouds.

If winds did not possess this property, water droplets in the upper atmosphere would never form, and there would be no rain.

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